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UK delays controversial ‘porn block’ law yet again after forgetting to inform EU

UK Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright

The UK’s proposed age verification system for viewing adult content is to be delayed yet again from its scheduled implementation on July 15.  

This will be the second time this year that the controversial ‘porn block’ law has been delayed.

The law, which was passed in 2017, has been highly controversial since its inception, with many arguing that it serves as an invasion of privacy rather than its originally intended purpose to protect children.

The law requires adults to prove their age when visiting pornographic websites, though there had been much confusion about how it would be implemented and regulated. It has been suggested that websites could ask users to upload scans of ID (such as a passport or drivers’ licence), or use age-verification cards sold by newsagents nicknamed “porn passes”.

The law will cover websites where more than a third of the content is pornographic. This means, in theory, that an adult website could make sure that the majority of its content is not pornographic and get around the law.

Likewise, the use of VPNs to evade the law will remain legal.

The rescheduled date of the law’s enforcement remains unclear.

While the law has been marred by controversy that hasn’t stopped the Irish government from investigating its own version.

As reported by The Journal, Ireland’s Justice Minister Charlie Flanagan said that the Irish government would “consult” with its British equivalent to review how well the law works, with a view to potentially implementing it in the country.